Update: Week of 7 October 2019

Fall is finally here (at least for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere), and we are thrilled with all the activity and community engagement we’ve experienced throughout the Tezos ecosystem. The Tezos community continues to grow and make itself known globally in various industries, not just the blockchain space.

In case you missed it, CoinDesk published a feature on last week’s TQuorum Global Summit. This week, members of the Tezos community traveled to Japan for the Ethereum Foundation’s DevCon 5. Tezos was well-represented at the conference, with Jacob Arluck of TQ Tezos and Adrian Brink of Cryptium Labs participating in a discussion on blockchain governance, and our own Ryan Lackey presenting on Tezos proof of stake.

As the Tezos community grows, it will need more and more dedicated local organizers to plan events and build the community in their regions. To that end, Tezos Commons put out a call for applications for meetup sponsors and Tezos local chapter organizers. If you want to contribute to the growth of the Tezos community in your area, we encourage you to apply!

The Tezos Foundation and Globacap announced their strategic partnership this week to accelerate Globacap’s efforts to bring capital markets into the digital age. “Amidst the noise of Brexit, a quiet revolution is underway in Europe that will change the way we view the very concept of public and private markets,” said Foundation Council member Hubertus Thonhauser. “Globacap is at the forefront of this important movement toward democratizing access to markets and rendering them more efficient.”

Finally, we were delighted to see that Elevated Returns’ Thai investee company has been granted an investment portal license from Thailand’s SEC, and will launch its first real estate-backed token on Tezos in the near future via a public offering in Thailand. This is an exciting step forward as we see the first assets in a $1bn pipeline of real estate assets be tokenized on the Tezos blockchain.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantees & Funded Entities
Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

 

Our Activities
Beyond the Foundation’s usual activities, several of which are described above, we would like to remind the entire community that there is only one week left to vote on the Babylon proposal! The Foundation has voted “pass” (meaning “abstain”) to remain neutral during the amendment process. This contributes to the required quorum and further elevates the voices of other members of the Tezos community. Learn more about the Tezos amendment process here.

Additionally, the Foundation Council has approved several grants outside of its standard grantmaking process. We look forward to announcing these projects in the coming weeks. Lastly, the current ecosystem grants RFP closes next Friday, 18 October. Submit a proposal before then to be considered for the next cohort!

FAQs

What is TF doing to market Tezos?
The Tezos Foundation is not a marketing entity. As our strategy statement outlines, “we believe our role within the community is to deploy resources that support the long-term future of Tezos. Grants offer a strategic way to help community members, such as educational and research institutions, developers, or activists from all over the world to support the advancement of this decentralized network.” 

That said – we do fund entities that do some marketing like Tezos Commons (TC), TQ Tezos (TQ), Tezos Southeast Asia (TSA), Tezos Japan, Tezos Korea, and others. If you have an idea for a marketing or related initiative that will add value to the Tezos ecosystem, submit an ecosystem grant application before next week’s deadline! We are eager to see creative proposals from the community.

What is the role of Tezos Commons (TC) and why should one apply to host a Tezos meetup and/or be a regional chapter organizer?
TC is built to support the ideas, individuals and organizations dedicated to building the Tezos digital commonwealth. It empowers the Tezos community to be architects through bootstrapping local communities, communications, promotion, education, funding open source initiatives, and advocacy. For individuals who become meetup sponsors and/or regional chapter organizers, TC provides dedicated funding and other support so that individual Tezos community members are able to grow the Tezos ecosystem where they are based and engage their own local communities.

 

Update: Week of 30 September 2019

Dear Tezos community,

I want to thank all of the global Tezos community members who made the trip to New York City for the first ever TQuorum Global Summit this week. Over 450 people joined us in the beautiful Spring Studios for two incredible days of panels, workshops, and discussions on a wide range of topics. These events and discussions are vital to build the Tezos community and drive the ecosystem forward. And efforts did not go unnoticed, CoinDesk’s Brady Dale published an article highlighting the shared values of the Tezos community, including open participation, token-holder-centricity, non-aggression, nuanced pragmatism and evolution (not revolution).

It was amazing to connect in-person with so many of you and learn about the projects you’ve been working on. We heard from many of our grantees and other funded entities on the main stage, including representatives from Cryptium Labs, Nomadic Labs, Truffle, TQ Tezos, and more. We also featured technical workshops from a host of grantees including: Airgap, Kidtsunami, Cryptonomic, SimpleStaking, Stove Labs, Clause, and SmartPy, among others. We look forward to the next opportunity to come together again.

Additionally, a reminder that there are only two weeks left in the current voting period on the Babylon proposal. While the Foundation will vote “pass” (meaning “abstain”), we are encouraged to see so much discussion and participation by all stakeholders in the Tezos ecosystem.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantees & Funded Entities
Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

Our Activities
In addition to our usual grant-making activities, many of the Foundation’s council members and other staff made the trip to TQuorum, including Ryan Jesperson, Ryan Lackey, Hubertus Thonhauser, Michel Mauny, and Roman Schnider. We appreciated the opportunities to talk in-depth with many growing projects, and see all of the development happening in the Tezos ecosystem.

FAQs

Do wallet developers need to make any changes to their code if the Babylon proposal is adopted?
Yes, wallet developers will need to migrate their code to be compatible with Babylon if it is accepted by Tezos stakeholders in the Promotion Vote Period. The Babylon protocol upgrade brings two big changes to the way delegation can be implemented. First, implicit (aka tz1) accounts can now directly delegate tokens. Second, the scriptless KT1 accounts, whose main purpose has been delegation, are replaced by smart contracts whose addresses are unchanged and scripts are manager.tz. For more on these changes and what wallet developers need to do to avoid breaking changes, please read these instructions from the team at Nomadic Labs and these technical details from Cryptium Labs

Update: Week of 23 September 2019

Dear Tezos community,

We can’t wait to connect with community members from around the world at the upcoming TQuorum Global Summit this Sunday through Tuesday at Spring Street Studios in NYC. The conference will run for three days, with one day focused on the proof of stake ecosystem and one day focused on digital assets. I will be speaking on Monday morning to welcome all of you to the conference. From there – those attending will hear from a number of our grantees and other funded entities, including Cryptium Labs, Nomadic Labs, Truffle, TQ Tezos, and many more. You can purchase your ticket for the summit here.

We are excited to see that the promotion vote period recently began for the current voting cycle in the Tezos amendment process. It will end in about three weeks. As in past voting cycles the Foundation will vote “pass” (meaning “abstain”) for the current period. We are encouraged by the substantive discussions in the community around proposals for protocol upgrades and are confident in the decision that the rest of the community makes.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantees & Funded Entities
Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

  • Happy Tezos released Tezos-as-a-Service (TaaS), which provides real-time updates to various applications on the Tezos blockchain by leveraging SignalR (WebSocket).
  • Edukera introduced its new Archetype website, which demonstrates how Archetype helps to develop more secure smart contracts on Tezos.
  • During the testing phase of protocol Babylon 005_PsBABY5H, Nomadic Labs discovered a bug affecting bigmaps in Michelson smart contracts, and corrected it in a proposal for a new version of Babylon. Cryptium Labs wrote its own summary of the bug and how it can be addressed.
  • ECAD LabsJev Björsell introduced Taquito, a new TypeScript library suite that can be used to build dApps or traditional web applications on top of the Tezos blockchain.
  • Tulip Tools gave a sneak peek of its upcoming beta of TPlus, which lets developers manage any number of Tezos nodes for use with mainnet, or alphanet, as well as sandbox environments used for local testing and (smart contract) development, and offers a ready-to-go development experience.
  • TQ Tezos published a guide to TQuorum Global Summit. Take a look if you are planning on attending.
  • Simple Staking published a guide on the Tezos peer-to-peer layer and its Rust implementation.
  • Nomadic Labs announced the first release of data-encoding, a library to encode and decode values to JSON or binary format.
  • Stove Labs released an update on its work over the past few weeks.

Our Activities
The Tezos Foundation participated in the latest round of funding for Securitize, one of the leading players in the digital securities sector. The $14 million financing round in which the Tezos Foundation participated was led by Nomura Groups and Santander InnoVentures and will help Securitize accelerate its go-to-market strategy. This investment aims to increase the adoption of Tezos in digital securities issuances.

On top of the Foundation’s regular duties this week, the team is excited to join the rest of the community at the TQuorum Global Summit in New York City from 29 September – 1 October. Ryan Jesperson and Ryan Lackey will both be speaking, with Hubertus Thonhauser, Michel Mauny, and Roman Schnider also attending. Grab your ticket now!

FAQs

What is inflation funding? How does it work?
Inflation funding is a mechanism that the Tezos protocol can use to fund the development of the core protocol and other public goods. Essentially how it works is simple – if an upgrade is approved via the Tezos governance process, the protocol itself mints new Tezos tokens (XTZ) and issues them to the developer(s) behind the upgrade. This process increases the total supply of XTZ and is designed to solve the free rider problem that open-source projects are particularly prone to. Inflation funding presents a sustainable source of funding that is not reliant on token price appreciation or private investment.

 

 

 

Update: Week of 16 September 2019

Dear Tezos community,
Congratulations on the one-year anniversary of Tezos becoming mainnet! We have a lot to look forward to as we stand at the one-year mark of mainnet. The TQuorum Global Summit begins on 29 September and will consist of 3 days of technical workshops, panels, and keynote speeches. There will be a day dedicated to staking and a day dedicated to digital securities. You can get a ticket to one or all of the days here.

Additionally, we were pleased to announce the release of a fundraiser password support tool. This tool aims to help fundraiser contributors with lost fundraiser passwords to attempt to recover their passwords and access the corresponding recommended allocations of Tezos tokens (tez). To use the tool, go to https://recovery.tezos.com/.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantee Updates

Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

Our Activities

In addition to releasing a fundraiser password recovery tool, the Foundation has been working hard to finalize a number of important grants. Specifically, the Foundation was pleased this week to announce that it has issued grants to Kyoto University and Edukera, based in Japan and France, respectively, to further advance the Tezos smart contract development ecosystem. Furthermore, this week we issued a new request for proposals (RFP) for Tezos ecosystem grants. We invite all parties eager to contribute to the Tezos project to submit grant applications.

On top of the Foundation’s grantmaking actions this week, the team is incredibly excited to join the rest of the community at the TQuorum Global Summit in New York City from 29 September – 1 October. Ryan Jesperson and Ryan Lackey will both be speaking. Grab your ticket now!

FAQs

Why doesn’t the Foundation release individual amounts for grants?

We strive to be as transparent in our actions as possible but if we released individual amounts and terms of every grant, we would lose leverage in attracting future grant proposals. If the terms of our grants are always made public, we will not be able to efficiently and effectively disperse funds. More importantly, given the sensitive nature of money, we respect our grantees’ right to keep their finances private. We included grant allocations for each category in our bi-annual report released in August.

Announcing New RFP for Ecosystem Grants

The Tezos Foundation is excited to issue its next request for proposals (RFP) for Tezos ecosystem grants. This RFP comes after last week’s announcement of the Foundation’s second cohort of ecosystem grantees.

For its next cohort of ecosystem grants, the Foundation will consider and accept proposals targeting the following categories:

  • Applications built using Tezos smart contracts (with special interest in Decentralized Finance, or “DeFi”, and digital securities applications)
  • Tools for Tezos smart contract development (e.g. smart contract testing tools, smart contract templates, etc.)
    • JavaScript libraries for building applications on Tezos and development kits for using such libraries
  • Educational/training resources covering Tezos (e.g. Kauri, CryptoZombies, etc.)
    • Online resources usable for self-training
    • Example applications with detailed tutorials showing technology selection and implementation
  • Marketing and other initiatives to help increase awareness of Tezos and its ecosystem
  • Other proposals for projects targeting categories not listed above that may benefit the Tezos ecosystem

Funding requests must not be greater than the 50,000 USD limit for ecosystem grants to be considered. Software tools to be supported must be made publicly available under an open-source license.

What to expect when submitting a grant application

Prospective applicants should submit grant proposals here.

Although a full review will take 4-6 weeks after the application period closes, if you have any questions about the status of your application, please email [email protected] Our team will get back to you within 24-48 hours with an update on your proposal’s status.

Proposals will be reviewed according to the process outlined below.

  1. All applications must be submitted no later than 18 October 2019 at 23:59 EST.
  2. After all applications are received, we will conduct an initial review to filter out proposals that are not in line with the Foundation’s priorities.
  3. Applications in line with our priorities will be sent to the Technical Advisory Committee for technical review.
  4. Upon completion of the Technical Advisory Committee review, successful applications will be sent to the Tezos Foundation Council for final decisions to be made. Applications that are approved by the Council will receive communication about next steps including due diligence and legal paperwork.
  5. Due diligence will begin and may include checks into prior technical work experience and projects, skills, background, references, etc.
  6. Upon successful clearance of due diligence, legal paperwork will be shared with prospective grantees for review and signatures. Once all legal documentation is completed, funds will be transferred to the approved projects.

Tezos Foundation Releases Fundraiser Password Support Tool

The Tezos Foundation is pleased to announce the release of a fundraiser password support tool. This tool aims to help fundraiser contributors with lost fundraiser passwords attempt to recover their passwords and access the corresponding recommended allocations of Tezos tokens (XTZ).

This fundraiser password support tool is available at https://recovery.tezos.com, including both instructions on how to use the tool and an offline encryption utility.  Please be aware of phishing attempts and take all available safety precautions. We remind you to never enter a fundraiser password, mnemonic, or other private key information unless you absolutely trust the source and can ensure your machine is free of malware.

For more resources and information about how to access a recommended allocation, visit the Get Started page of Tezos.com. Those in need of support may also email [email protected] with any questions.

 

Tezos Foundation Issues Grants for Tezos Smart Contract Projects

The Tezos Foundation is pleased to announce that it has issued grants to Kyoto University and Edukera, based in Japan and France, respectively, to further advance the Tezos smart contract development ecosystem.

Kyoto University is the second oldest Japanese university and one of Asia’s leading research institutions with 18 Nobel laureates, more than any other university in Asia. With this grant, Kyoto University has conducted research on the current, simple Michelson type-checking to develop static verification techniques for Michelson and higher-level Tezos smart contract languages.

Led by Atsushi Igarashi, Ph.D., a professor at the Graduate School of Informatics, and Kohei Suenaga, Ph.D., an associate professor at the Graduate School of Informatics, the team will create an accessible development tool for these verification techniques and contribute to the growth of the Tezos ecosystem in Japan and the greater Asia region. Jun Furuse of DaiLambda and Tezos Japan collaborates with Kyoto University on this project.

Edukera is an online application to teach formal logic and math. Founded in 2013 by Benoit Rognier and Guillaume Duhamel, the team has a proven ability to provide the public with learning solutions based on the Coq proof assistant.

Led by scientific director Pierre-Yves Strub, an assistant professor at and Ph.D. recipient in Computer Science of École Polytechnique in Paris, France, the Edukera team has formally verified properties of several Tezos smart contracts and begun development of a new Tezos smart contracts language, Archetype. Archetype is a domain-specific language to develop smart contracts on Tezos, with a specific focus on more easily facilitating formal verification.

The Tezos Foundation’s core mission is to support the long-term success of the Tezos protocol and ecosystem. By funding projects created by scientists, researchers, developers, entrepreneurs, and enthusiasts, the Foundation encourages decentralized development and robust participation.

Update: Week of 9 September 2019

Dear Tezos community,
At the Foundation, we believe that funding projects created by a diverse set of teams and developers encourages decentralized development and robust participation in the Tezos ecosystem. This is one of our key guiding principles and it was at the front of our minds when we were evaluating applications for our second cohort of Tezos ecosystem grants.

This second cohort of grantees includes:

  • Runtime Verification
  • Catsigma
  • Matthew Smith
  • Norn Community
  • Klas Harrysson
  • ECAD Labs
  • Reason Association
  • Agile Ventures
  • Baking Bad
  • Protofire
  • fabr(x)
  • OCaml Software Foundation
  • Ackee

For more information on what each of these grantees is working on, you can read our full announcement here. Some of these grantees also published their own blog posts about their grants. Links to these are included in our announcement above.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantee Updates
Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

Our Activities
This week, we were proud to announce our second cohort of ecosystem grants. In this cohort, we’ve given out 14 new grants to projects that will strengthen the Tezos ecosystem. We thank the 38 applicants who worked with us through the review process and look forward to the next round of ecosystem grants. The application for the next round opens next week on 18 September. In addition to this announcement, we:

  • Met with teams that are working on the core protocol and learned more about their upcoming plans. More communication from these teams will come at TQuorum: Tezos Global Summit in NYC.
  • The Foundation and other community members continue to receive a significant amount of inquiries from developers eager to build on Tezos – we are exploring further opportunities and use cases.
  • Brought on additional communications capabilities at the Foundation. One of the first projects will be a redesign of the Foundation’s website.
  • We appreciate your continued patience on our password recovery tool. The launch is imminent but there were some additional features that we wanted to include that are now being finalized and taking a bit more time. We look forward to launching this tool next week.

FAQs

Do wallet developers need to make any changes to their code if the Babylon 2.0 proposal is adopted?
Yes, wallet developers will need to migrate their code to be compatible with Babylon 2.0 if it is accepted by stakeholders in the Promotion Vote Period. The Babylon 2.0 protocol upgrade brings two big changes to the way delegation can be implemented. First, implicit (aka tz1) accounts can now directly delegate their tokens. Second, the scriptless KT1 accounts, whose main purpose has been delegation, are replaced by smart contracts whose addresses are unchanged and script is manager.tz. For more on these changes and what wallet developers need to do to avoid breaking changes, please read these instructions from the team at Nomadic Labs and these technical details from Cryptium Labs.

Announcing Second Cohort of Tezos Ecosystem Grants

The Tezos Foundation is pleased to announce that 14 new grants have been issued to projects submitted in response to its most recent request for proposals (RFP).

The Foundation considered proposals targeting the following categories as part of this RFP:

  • Applications built using Tezos smart contracts (with special interest in Decentralized Finance or “DeFi” applications)
  • Tezos block explorers and/or innovative related tools
  • Tools for Tezos smart contract development (e.g. smart contract testing tools, etc.)
  • Educational/training resources covering Tezos (e.g. Kauri, CryptoZombies, etc.)
  • Marketing and other initiatives to help increase awareness of Tezos and its ecosystem

After the Foundation’s Technical Advisory Committee (“TAC”) reviewed all submissions and provided recommendations to the Foundation Council for final decisions to be made, legal documents for approved grants were completed and grant funds have started to be issued.

The Foundation is thrilled to support the following projects in this cohort of Tezos ecosystem grants:

  • Formal Semantics of Michelson in K, Preparing for Smart Contract Verification by Runtime Verification: Runtime Verification is a company aimed at using runtime verification-based techniques to improve the safety, reliability, and correctness of software systems. The purpose of this grant is to develop a formal semantics and reference implementation of Michelson, a domain-specific language for Tezos smart contracts, in the K Framework. The K language is designed to make language definitions as readable as possible while still ensuring a K semantics has a precise mathematical meaning, and is supported by the tools of the K Framework. The Runtime Verification team will also publish documentation and interact with the wider Tezos developer community as part of this project.
  • Misualizer and TezBridge documentation by Catsigma: Built by Tezos developer Catsigma, Misualizer is a tool that will allow users to visualize all possible behaviors of Tezos smart contracts and trace all of their internal transactions to get complete pictures of different entry points. Catsigma is also the developer of TezBridge, a tool that allows users to interact with applications built on Tezos. Catsigma has received an additional grant to improve the documentation of TezBridge with detailed text manuals, screen recorded GIFs for all features, an improved “playground”, and several complete application examples.
  • Learn You a Tezos for Much Prosperity by Matthew Smith: This grant will support Matthew Smith, an active member of the Tezos community, with a project to write and publish a book to help onboard more Tezos bakers and smart contract developers to the Tezos ecosystem. The book will be freely available, permissively licensed, and will contain software (MIT licensed) for a remote signer with tests and documentation as well as scripts for securing Ubuntu.
  • TezosNotifierBot by the Norn Community: The Norn Community’s TezosNotifierBot is a popular Telegram bot used to monitor various events on the Tezos blockchain, such as transactions, delegations, missing block endorsements, double baking, etc. With this grant, the Norn Community will improve its @TezosNotifierBot for Telegram and expand the bot to support other notification channels, such as Twitter.
  • Tezos.help by Klas Harrysson: Tezos.help was built by Klas Harrysson in 2017 to help guide new members into the Tezos community and serve as an active repository of various Tezos resources. As part of this project, Klas will expand the original Tezos.help website into a full-fledged, self-sustaining library of all relevant Tezos ecosystem projects and resources.
  • Grafana Data Plugin for Tezos & Signatory, a Remote Signer by ECAD Labs: ECAD Labs is a software & services consultancy that delivers and manages projects in the areas of software development, systems engineering, open-source development and support. ECAD Labs will develop a Grafana data source plugin for Tezos and improve Signatory, a Tezos remote signer, by adding rich policy rules to control which operations get signed or rejected, support for more cloud-based HSMs to provide the Tezos community with a more diverse range of options, and approval groups to allow human approval for key operations (transfers or voting). Documentation and tutorials will also be produced. Read ECAD Labs’ blog post to learn more.
  • Growing the ReasonML community by the Reason Association: ReasonML is a web development platform and alternative syntax on top of OCaml, which allows developers to write type-safe web applications with a strong focus on the ReactJS ecosystem; it’s also a language that can be used to write Tezos smart contracts. This grant will help the Reason Association grow the ReasonML community by releasing more effective learning materials and tools, such as a refined documentation platform for existing users and newcomers, and producing Tezos-related content and resources to help encourage more members of the ReasonML community to get involved in the Tezos ecosystem.
  • Tezos as a Service (TaaS) by Agile Ventures: Agile Ventures is an in-house software development team and consultancy group that has worked on a number of projects since 2016, most recently Happy Tezos, a Tezos delegation service. TaaS is a service that will provide a WebSocket endpoint to allow application developers to collect real-time information from the Tezos blockchain. Anyone will be able to run their own instance of TaaS or use a free version provided by Agile Ventures, which will offer 20,000 updates per day and 20 concurrent connections.
  • TzKT by Baking Bad: Baking Bad is an active Tezos development team. This grant will support the team with its next project, TzKT, a lightweight, API-first, account oriented block explorer for the Tezos blockchain.
  • DeFi developer experience by Protofire: Protofire is a blockchain and smart contracts development team that will create an initial version of a liquidity pool smart contract accompanied by a basic client to demonstrate the contract’s functionality and tutorials explaining the implementation and possible variations.
  • “If Tezos” – The “If This Then That” (IFTTT) for Tezos by fabr(x): This project by the fabr(x) team will produce a protocol-level trigger and events platform for the Tezos blockchain, thus supporting automated API methods and trigger-based functions for applications. Read fabr(x)’s blog post to learn more.
  • Learn-OCaml by the OCaml Software Foundation: OCaml is the functional programming language that is used to implement Tezos. The “Learn-OCaml” project aims to increase the usage of OCaml in education and promotes its mainstream adoption. This grant will help the OCaml Software Foundation improve its current OCaml MOOC (“massive open online course”), develop a new OCaml MOOC with automatically graded exercises, and launch a collaborative project to build an advanced and interactive textbook to more effectively teach functional programming in OCaml to a wider audience.
  • TezosSwift DevKit POC App by Ackee: Ackee is a mobile development company located in Prague and Berlin. Ackee will build a Proof-of-Concept iOS application that will demonstrate how to use its TezosSwift library, which is forked from Keefer Taylor’s TezosKit, accompanied with step-by-step tutorials

The Foundation is excited to see these projects contribute to the advancement of the Tezos project and grow the larger blockchain ecosystem. Thank you to all 38 applicants who worked with us throughout the review process. The next Ecosystem Grants RFP period will open on 18 September 2019. Areas of interest will be announced when the RFP is issued.

The Tezos Foundation’s core mission is to support the long-term success of the Tezos protocol and ecosystem. As part of that mission, the Foundation’s Ecosystem Grants Program is designed to address key short and medium-term priorities in an efficient and agile manner. Funding projects created by a diverse set of teams and developers encourages decentralized development and robust participation.

Update: Week of 2 September 2019

Dear Tezos community,
The summer may be coming to a close but the work of the Tezos community continues full steam ahead. This quick snapshot of September events from Tezos Commons highlights many of the Tezos events to be excited for this month:

It is incredibly exciting to see the Tezos community grow in so many different places around the world and I look forward to seeing where new communities sprout up in the future. 

In addition to these events happening around the world this month, the global Tezos community is getting closer to a final decision on the Babylon 2.0 proposal, which is currently in the Testing Period of the Tezos amendment process. For more information about Babylon 2.0 (and future amendments), join the discussions happening on Agora – a governance explorer and discussion forum for Tezos, developed by TQ and Tezos Commons.

Best regards,
Ryan

Grantee Updates
Below are some updates on our grantees and other funded entities from the last week:

  • Tezsure launched Tezster, a testing tool for Tezos. It currently comes as a CLI and can interact with local nodes and the Tezos alphanet.
  • Tulip Tools is now hosting snapshots for all Tezos networks via IPFS to make it even faster to run a Tezos node. 
  • Tezos Korea signed an MOU with Hexlant, a prominent blockchain technology institute, to discuss technical cooperation on operating Tezos nodes and running a custody business with financial institutions.
  • Tezos Southeast Asia will be attending the ACCA Tech Symposium next week.
  • Truffle gave a sneak peak into their work on Tezos integration to Truffle Suite.
  • Cryptium Labs launched a research and development blog. Check out some of the posts on Tezos here.
  • TQ Tezos published an update on the 1,000 New Tezos Developers initiative on their blog.
  • Gabriel Alfour of The Marigold Project started a thread on Agora discussing Plasma, a scaling technique, and different approaches to implement it on Tezos.

Our Activities
The Foundation’s work continued last week as we continued to finalize the latest cohort of ecosystem grants and monitored the assets under the Foundation’s control. In addition to those regular administrative duties, we are:

  • Putting final touches on the password recovery tool. As you can imagine we take this tool very seriously as it deals with sensitive information. We appreciate your patience and it should be released next week. 
  • Evaluating options for additional team members to join the Foundation.

FAQs

What happened to the “$50M Venture Capital for Developers and Startups” that was announced in August of 2017?
The previous council of the TF announced in August of 2017 that it would allocate $50M of venture capital for Tezos developers and startups. In the first part of 2018, the new council evaluated the situation and established its priorities. As you can imagine, our top priority and focus was to deploy resources to support the launch of the Tezos betanet.

In addition to the launch of the first production network, another priority was to deploy resources throughout the community to further the Tezos ecosystem. An initial strategy statement was released in June of 2018 which highlights that grants would be an important part of the Foundation’s role in the ecosystem. Significant funds have been deployed since then to support developers and others throughout the community. Last month the Foundation’s first Biannual Update was published which highlights that USD 37.4M has been committed to the following areas: Research, Education, & Core Development; Community Initiatives; Ecosystem – Tools & Applications. For more details on the Foundation’s grantmaking efforts, please see the biannual update. All this is laying the groundwork for further development and startup growth on Tezos.

As we see the emergence of a first major use case, asset tokenization and, in particular, Security Token Offerings (STOs) on Tezos, we are exploring additional funding mechanisms to support the growth of the Tezos project in this area as well as other key areas of focus as they develop. Indeed, the biannual update not only mentions grants but also “other capital deployment vehicles” as a means of funding. We are open to deploying funds in a variety of ways for a variety of use cases and will continue to explore the most effective way to further the Tezos project and ecosystem.

How does the Tezos Foundation vote on proposed amendments to Tezos?
The Foundation does not upvote any proposals during the Proposal Period. Additionally, the Foundation votes “Pass” (meaning explicitly abstaining) rather than “Yea” or “Nay” during the Exploration Vote Period and Promotion Vote Period to remain neutral during the amendment process. This contributes to the required quorum and further elevates the voices of other members of the Tezos community. Learn more about the Tezos amendment process here.